Iron, like a lion in Syon? More like the lion sleeps tonight

curranwalsh

Happier days: Brendon Walsh and Steve Curran survey all they command

By lil’ red mole

Council leader Steve Curran and allies Katherine Dunne and Theo Dennison cleared the trigger ballot for councillor selection on 6 December.  That means they automatically go through to represent Labour in Syon ward in the May 2018 council elections. Steve received 21 of the 35 votes from Syon ward Labour Party members at the meeting, with Katherine and Theo garnering slightly more.

Continue reading “Iron, like a lion in Syon? More like the lion sleeps tonight”

Labour right warns of crisis as party lead soars

Momentum Hounslow responds to Roy Hattersley’s red baiting in the Observer

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What failure looks like: Hattersley and Kinnock

By the lil’ red mole

Just as pollsters put Labour eight points ahead, Roy  Hattersley announces in the pages of the Observer that the party is in its deepest crisis ever.

For those too young to remember Mr Hattersley, he is a veteran Labour right winger and was deputy to Neil Kinnock. So, to be fair, he knows a thing or two about losing elections.

Continue reading “Labour right warns of crisis as party lead soars”

Labour must reject ‘business-as-usual’ housing policy after Grenfell

New graphic for Angie

By Eileen Short

Defend Council Housing – Homes for All

The struggle for a safe secure home, dominates life today. A desperate need for homes that meet need, not just make money, means growing support for radical new housing policies.

Jeremy Corbyn’s commitment to build new council housing was a major break in the Tory mould, that helped Labour win credibility and votes in the June 2017 election.

Corbyn’s own ten-point pre- election plan included a “secure homes guarantee”: to build one million new homes in five years, at least half of them council homes, along with rent controls and secure tenancies for private renters. Corbyn’s commitments inspired Labour supporters, and is what millions expect from Corbyn’s Labour. Continue reading “Labour must reject ‘business-as-usual’ housing policy after Grenfell”

An open letter to Ruth Cadbury

Dear Ruth,

I think that your letter on an “organised plan by a particular group to “take over control” of our constituency party” was unhelpful.

When dealing with contentious issues we all have to exercise the utmost care to avoid descending in to vague allusions to shadowy enemies with outrageous views. It is therefore to be regretted that you did not see fit to give the source of your information. Who sent the email to which you refer? What was its purpose? For whom was it intended? Without such information we are just dealing with political noise. Can you not agree that this is not the right way to debate political differences? Continue reading “An open letter to Ruth Cadbury”

Responding to Grenfell

Housing has been a critical issue both locally and nationally for decades, but the dire implications of government policies were brought sharply and tragically into focus after the recent inferno in Grenfell Tower. In Hounslow, we feel that it’s time to launch a housing group to work to improve housing conditions in the borough and to apply pressure on the local authorities. We hope that people will be able to get involved and contribute to making this a success and we would like to encourage everyone who is able to lend a hand. Read more…

Labour MPs put internal divisions on public display again

The anti-Corbyn camp told us for two years that electoral advance was impossible under Corbyn’s leadership. The majority of Labour MPs were so sure of it that the opened party divisions to full public view with a vote of no confidence against the leader which 75% of Labour MPs supported (including Ruth Cadbury and Seema Malhotra). And yet Labour rise in the polls was the biggest since 1945. Labour had experienced dramatic decline from the moment when Tony Blair became prime minister – the data is undeniable. It reached its lowest point of public support in the election of 2010 (led by Gordon Brown). Five years later Labour lifted itself marginally from a historic low point by just 2% (led by Ed Miliband) but clearly there was no sea change. Continue reading “Labour MPs put internal divisions on public display again”

The Political “Centre Ground” – Some Good Advice

The July issue of Prospect has an article by Steve Richards commenting on the outcome of the 2017 general election (All shook up: this election result upended stale assumptions about “centrist” politics). There is a clear message about the judgement of most Labour MPs being seriously clouded by some false assumptions about what works in politics. After ranging over the turmoil arising from 2015 election, Brexit, Scottish independence, Bernie Sanders in the US presidential race, Emmanuel Macron’s election in France, Syriza, and the fall of the French Socialist Party he turns to our recent general election. Continue reading “The Political “Centre Ground” – Some Good Advice”